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The Next Chapter

Looking for more great true crime stories, shows, podcasts and media? In “The Next Chapter” podcast, Esther Ludlow, Host of Once Upon a Crime, interviews authors, podcasters, filmmakers and other creators in the true crime field who share their latest projects.

Episodes


“The Amityville Murders”

On this episode, I discuss the new movie "The Amityville Murders" with the director Daniel Farrands. 

With his new film, Farrands out to tell the real story of the DeFeo family mass murder that took place in Amityville, New York in 1974. Many became familiar with the story of the haunting that the Lutz family reported after moving into the DeFeo home a year after the murders.  A best-selling book and film both titled “The Amityville Horror” focused on the Lutz’s paranormal experiences in the Amityville house and became a sensation, but the true crime story of the DeFeo murders is less well known.


“In the Name of the Children”

I interview Jeff Rinek, retired Special Agent with the FBI who served 30 years investigating cases of missing and murdered children.  We talk at length about Cary Stayner the serial killer responsible for the Yosemite National Park Murders in 1999.  


“The Acid King”

In this episode I interview author Jesse Pollack about his book The Acid King that details a true crime case that happened in Northport, New York in the summer of 1984. 


The Lost Pilots

I interview author Corey Mead about his book The Lost Pilots which details a fascinating true crime case from the 1920s.


Author Harold Schechter

On this episode of "The Next Chapter", I speak with serial killer expert and true crime author Harold Schechter about his new book, Hell's Princess: The Mystery of Belle Gunness, Butcher of Men and about his work researching and writing about infamous serial killers.  


“Pure Land”

Pure Land is the story of the brutal murder of a young Japanese tourist named Tomomi Hanamure who was found stabbed to death while hiking to Grand Canyon's Havasu Falls.  But, it is also the story of three cultures - Japanese, American and Native American, the cycle of family violence, nature, spirituality, healing and so much more.